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  • IMPACT Projections of Demand for Agricultural Products: Extended Country-level Results for 2017 GFPR Annex IMPACT Trend 1
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    Policy makers, analysts, and civil society face increasing challenges to reducing hunger and improving food security in a sustainable way. Modeling alternative future scenarios and assessing their outcomes can help inform their choices. The International Food Policy Research Institute's IMPACT model is an integrated system of linked economic, climate, water, and crop models that allows for exploration such scenarios. At IMPACT's core is a partial equilibrium, multimarket economic model that simulates national and international agricultural markets. Links to climate, water, and crop models support the integrated study of changing environmental, biophysical, and socioeconomic trends, allowing for in-depth analysis of a variety of critical issues of interest to policy makers at national, regional, and global levels. IMPACT benefits from close interactions with scientists at all 15 CGIAR research centers through the Global Futures and Strategic Foresight (GFSF) program, and with other leading global economic modeling efforts around the world through Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). This dataset summarizes results from the latest IMPACT projections to 2030 and 2050. Results are included for total demand and demand index of various agricultural commodities, by region and for selected countries. The projections are for two "baseline scenarios"-one considers the impacts of climate change, while the assumes no climate change (for comparison).
  • IMPACT Projections of Food Production, Consumption, and Hunger to 2050, With and Without Climate Change: Extended Country-level Results for 2017 GFPR Annex Table 6
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI);. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    Policy makers, analysts, and civil society face increasing challenges to reducing hunger and improving food security in a sustainable way. Modeling alternative future scenarios and assessing their outcomes can help inform their choices. The International Food Policy Research Institute's IMPACT model is an integrated system of linked economic, climate, water, and crop models that allows for exploration such scenarios. At IMPACT's core is a partial equilibrium, multimarket economic model that simulates national and international agricultural markets. Links to climate, water, and crop models support the integrated study of changing environmental, biophysical, and socioeconomic trends, allowing for in-depth analysis of a variety of critical issues of interest to policy makers at national, regional, and global levels. IMPACT benefits from close interactions with scientists at all 15 CGIAR research centers through the Global Futures and Strategic Foresight (GFSF) program, and with other leading global economic modeling efforts around the world through Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). This dataset summarizes results from the latest IMPACT projections to 2030 and 2050. Results are included for production, consumption, and for the population at risk of hunger, by region and for selected countries. The projections are for two "baseline scenarios"-one considers the impacts of climate change, while the assumes no climate change (for comparison).
  • 2017 Global Hunger Index Data
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); Welthungerhilfe (WHH); Concern Worldwide. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is a tool designed to comprehensively measure and track hunger globally, regionally, and by country. Each year, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) calculates GHI scores in order to assess progress, or the lack thereof, in decreasing hunger. The GHI is designed to raise awareness and understanding of regional and country differences in the struggle against hunger. Since 2015, GHI scores have been calculated using a revised and improved formula. The revision replaces child underweight, previously the sole indicator of child undernutrition, with two indicators of child undernutrition—child wasting and child stunting—which are equally weighted in the GHI calculation. The revised formula also standardizes each of the component indicators to balance their contribution to the overall index and to changes in the GHI scores over time. The 2017 GHI has been calculated for 119 countries for which data on the four component indicators are a
  • IMPACT Projections of Change in Total Aggregate Cereal Demand, 2010-2050: Extended Country-level Results for 2017 GFPR Annex IMPACT Trend 2
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    Policy makers, analysts, and civil society face increasing challenges to reducing hunger and improving food security in a sustainable way. Modeling alternative future scenarios and assessing their outcomes can help inform their choices. The International Food Policy Research Institute's IMPACT model is an integrated system of linked economic, climate, water, and crop models that allows for exploration such scenarios. At IMPACT's core is a partial equilibrium, multimarket economic model that simulates national and international agricultural markets. Links to climate, water, and crop models support the integrated study of changing environmental, biophysical, and socioeconomic trends, allowing for in-depth analysis of a variety of critical issues of interest to policy makers at national, regional, and global levels. IMPACT benefits from close interactions with scientists at all 15 CGIAR research centers through the Global Futures and Strategic Foresight (GFSF) program, and with other leading global economic modeling efforts around the world through Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). This dataset summarizes results from the latest IMPACT projections to 2030 and 2050. Results are included for production, consumption, and trade of major food commodity groups, by regions and country. The projections are for two "baseline scenarios"-one considers the impacts of climate change, while the assumes no climate change (for comparison).
  • IMPACT Projections of Share of Population at Risk of Hunger: Extended Country-level Results for 2017 GFPR Annex IMPACT Trend 3
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    Policy makers, analysts, and civil society face increasing challenges to reducing hunger and improving food security in a sustainable way. Modeling alternative future scenarios and assessing their outcomes can help inform their choices. The International Food Policy Research Institute's IMPACT model is an integrated system of linked economic, climate, water, and crop models that allows for exploration such scenarios. At IMPACT's core is a partial equilibrium, multimarket economic model that simulates national and international agricultural markets. Links to climate, water, and crop models support the integrated study of changing environmental, biophysical, and socioeconomic trends, allowing for in-depth analysis of a variety of critical issues of interest to policy makers at national, regional, and global levels. IMPACT benefits from close interactions with scientists at all 15 CGIAR research centers through the Global Futures and Strategic Foresight (GFSF) program, and with other leading global economic modeling efforts around the world through Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). This dataset summarizes results from the latest IMPACT projections to 2030 and 2050. Results are included for production, consumption, and trade of major food commodity groups, by regions and country. The projections are for two "baseline scenarios"-one considers the impacts of climate change, while the assumes no climate change (for comparison).
  • IMPACT Projections of Food Production, Consumption, and Net Trade to 2050, With and Without Climate Change: Extended Country-level Results for 2017 GFPR Annex Table 7
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    Policy makers, analysts, and civil society face increasing challenges to reducing hunger and improving food security in a sustainable way. Modeling alternative future scenarios and assessing their outcomes can help inform their choices. The International Food Policy Research Institute's IMPACT model is an integrated system of linked economic, climate, water, and crop models that allows for exploration such scenarios. At IMPACT's core is a partial equilibrium, multimarket economic model that simulates national and international agricultural markets. Links to climate, water, and crop models support the integrated study of changing environmental, biophysical, and socioeconomic trends, allowing for in-depth analysis of a variety of critical issues of interest to policy makers at national, regional, and global levels. IMPACT benefits from close interactions with scientists at all 15 CGIAR research centers through the Global Futures and Strategic Foresight (GFSF) program, and with other l
  • CELL5M: A geospatial data and analytics platform of harmonized multi-disciplinary data layers for Africa South of the Sahara
    HarvestChoice, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); University of Minnesota. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    Spatially-explicit data is increasingly becoming available across disciplines, yet they are often limited to a specific domain. In order to use such datasets in a coherent analysis, such as to decide where to target specific types of agricultural investment, there should be an effort to make such datasets harmonized and interoperable. For Africa South of the Sahara (SSA) region, the HarvestChoice CELL5M Database was developed in this spirit of moving multidisciplinary data into one harmonized, geospatial database. The database includes over 750 biophysical and socio-economic indicators, many of which can be easily expanded to global scale. The CELL5M database provides a platform for cross-cutting spatial analyses and fine-grain visualization of the mix of farming systems and populations across SSA. It was created as the central core to support a decision-making platform that would enable development practitioners and researchers to explore multi-faceted spatial relationships at the nexus of poverty, health and nutrition, farming systems, innovation, and environment. The database is a matrix populated by over 350,000 grid cells covering SSA at five arc-minute spatial resolution. Users of the database, including those conduct researches on agricultural policy, research, and development issues, can also easily overlay their own indicators. Numerical aggregation of the gridded data by specific geographical domains, either at subnational level or across country borders for more regional analysis, is also readily possible without needing to use any specific GIS software. See the HCID database ( http://dx.doi.org/10.7910/DVN/MZLXVQ ) for the geometry of each grid cell. The database also provides standard-compliant data API that currently powers several web-based data visualization and analytics tools.
  • Rapid yield gap assessment: African Development Bank's priority commodities
    HarvestChoice, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    Yield gap of nine priority commodities of the African Development Bank was assessed and aggregated at two levels across the Africa continent: 1) agro-ecological zones and 2) agro-ecological zones by country. In this rapid assessment, the yield gap was defined as the percentage difference between the actual yield estimated from spatially-disaggregated crop production statistics database and the potential yield retrieved from the FAO's Global Agro-Ecological Zones database, both at the 10-km pixel level.
  • Travel time to markets in Africa South of the Sahara
    HarvestChoice, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    Reliable market accessibility data is critical to develop agricultural policies and investment plans for ensuring smallholder farmers’ market participation and their profitable farming, yet this data is less frequently updated. Most of publicly available data benchmarks around the year 2000, not reflecting rapid development of transportation infrastructure in Africa South of the Sahara (SSA) in last decade. For this, using a newly available accessibility model input datasets, such as new land cover data from satellites, crowdsourced road network data, and updated population of major human settlements across SSA, HarvestChoice Project updated the existing market accessibility data and provides new market accessibility data layers benchmarking around the year 2010. The dataset includes five data layers representing travel time to the nearest market of five sizes (population of 20K, 50K, 100K, 250K, and 500K), respectively, on 5 arc-minute grids across SSA.
  • Egypt Disaggregated Social Accounting Matrix, 2010/11
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS), Arab Republic of Egypt. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    This data study includes disaggregated social accounting matrix (SAM) for the Egyptian economy for year 2010/11. This new SAM builds on the previous SAM 2010/11 built and published by Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS) with the support of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). This SAM was constructed with a special focus on the agriculture sector and on income distribution amongst households. It is composed of 52 activity sectors, 49 commodity sectors, three types of factors of production: labor (unskilled labor, semiskilled labor, and skilled labor), land, and capital; a government account, as well as, enterprises, households, savings and investment, and the rest of the world (ROW). The household sector is divided spatially into urban and rural households, with each disaggregated into 10 deciles according to expenditure. The disaggregated SAM allows for analyzing agricultural issues at the detailed crop level and to better understand the potential impacts of policy changes for both better off and more vulnerable households.
  • Tunisia Social Accounting Matrix, 2012
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); Institut Supérieur Agronomique de Chott-Mariem . Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    The Tunisia Social Accounting Matrix (SAM), 2012 was built with a focus on analyzing the structure and importance of the agriculture and trade in the Tunisian economy. This SAM helps to understand the linkages between agricultural production, factor income distribution, and households' incomes and expenditures. The 2012 Input-Output (I-O) and the supply-use table were the two main data sources used in building the disaggregated activity sector and commodity accounts. One of the most important added values of this SAM is the estimation of agricultural technologies.
  • 2016 Global Hunger Index Data
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); Welthungerhilfe (WHH); Concern Worldwide. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is a tool designed to comprehensively measure and track hunger globally, regionally, and by country. Each year, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) calculates GHI scores in order to assess progress, or the lack thereof, in decreasing hunger. The GHI is designed to raise awareness and understanding of regional and country differences in the struggle against hunger. Since 2015, GHI scores have been calculated using a revised and improved formula. The revision replaces child underweight, previously the sole indicator of child undernutrition, with two indicators of child undernutrition—child wasting and child stunting—which are equally weighted in the GHI calculation. The revised formula also standardizes each of the component indicators to balance their contribution to the overall index and to changes in the GHI scores over time. The 2016 GHI has been calculated for 118 countries for which data on the four component indicators are available and where measuring hunger is considered most relevant. GHI scores are not calculated for some higher income countries where the prevalence of hunger is very low. The GHI is only as current as the data for its four component indicators. This year's GHI reflects the most recent available country-level data and projections available between 2011 and 2016. It therefore reflects the hunger levels during this period rather than solely capturing conditions in 2016. The 1992, 2000, 2008, and 2016 GHI scores reflect the latest revised data for the four component indicators of the GHI. Where original source data were not available, the estimates of the GHI component indicators were based on the most recent data available. The four component indicators used to calculate the GHI scores draw upon data from the following sources: 1. Undernourishment: Updated data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) were used for the 1992, 2000, 2008, and 2016 GHI scores. Undernourishment data and projections for the 2016 GHI are for 2014-2016. 2. Child wasting and stunting: The child undernutrition indicators of the GHI—child wasting and child stunting—include data from the joint database of United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Bank, and additional data from WHO's continuously updated Global Database on Child Growth and Malnutrition; the most recent Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) reports; and statistical tables from UNICEF. For the 2016 GHI, data on child wasting and child stunting are for the latest year for which data are available in the period 2011-2015. 3. Child mortality: Updated data from the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation were used for the 1992, 2000, 2008, and 2016 GHI scores. For the 2016 GHI, data on child mortality are from 2015.
  • 2015 Global Nutrition Report Dataset
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) . Washington DC: IFPRI. 2015
    Abstract | Full Text
    The 2015 Global Nutrition Report Dataset contains data for all the indicators that were used in Global Nutrition Report 2015: Actions and Accountability to Accelerate the World's Progress on Nutrition . The data are compiled from secondary sources including United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Bank (WB) among many others. The dataset broadly contains information on adult and child nutrition, economic demography, nutrition intervention coverage, and policy legislation in the nutrition sector.
  • 2015 Global Hunger Index Data
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); Welthungerhilfe (WHH); Concern Worldwide. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2015
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  • Statistics on public expenditures for economic development (SPEED)
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2015
    Abstract | Full Text
    Public expenditure is a powerful instrument for governments to use in achieving sustainable growth, poverty reduction, and transformation. Understanding the linkages between different types of public expenditure and development can help governments to better allocate their resources in a manner consistent with their policy objectives and citizens’ needs and priorities. Development practitioners, donors, and the general public have increasingly requested expenditure accountability and transparency in the use of public resources. Transparency in public spending allows governments to better track, monitor, and evaluate the impacts of investment decisions and to invest in the provision of public goods and services that benefit the rural poor (such as agricultural research and extension, health, education, and social protection) and provide a conducive environment for private-sector investments. Against this background, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) launched and made publicly available the Statistics on Public Expenditures for Economic Development (SPEED) database in 2010. The database aims to provide policymakers, researchers, and the broader development community with the most comprehensive public expenditure information. This is the third major update of the dataset since 2010 (the second major update was made available in 2013). This third update includes an expanded time coverage, 1980 to 2012, and an additional economic sector, fuels and energy. While data were not always available for all the 147 countries included in the dataset, significant efforts were made in updating the data for as many countries as possible. This 2015 version includes a total of ten sectors: agriculture, communication, education, defense, health, mining, social protection, fuel and energy, transport, and transport and communication (as a group). Prior to 1990, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) presented the expenditures on transport and communications as one combined sector. Since 1990, the expenditures have been reported separately as two sectors. The new version of the SPEED dataset presents the expenditures on the two sectors separately as well as combined for completeness of information.
  • Agro-ecological zones for Africa South of the Sahara
    HarvestChoice, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2015
    Abstract | Full Text
    Agro-Ecological Zones (AEZ) for Africa South of the Sahara (SSA) were developed based on the methodology developed by FAO and IIASA. The dataset includes three classification schemes: 5, 8, and 16 classes, referred to as the AEZ5, AEZ8, and AEZ16, respectively.
  • ASTI Oman database
    Agricultural Science and Technology Indicators (ASTI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2014
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  • Iraq Social Accounting Matrix, 2011
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2014
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  • Yemen Social Accounting Matrix, 2012
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI); Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation (MoPIC), Government of Yemen; Kiel Institute for the World Economy. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2014
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  • ASTI Morocco database
    Agricultural Science and Technology Indicators (ASTI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2014
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