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Books

  • Regional developments
    Makombe, Tsitsi; Collins, Julia; Badiane, Ousmane; Breisinger, Clemens; Abdelaziz, Fatma; Khouri, Nadim; Akramov, Kamiljon T.; Park, Allen; Ilyasov, Jarilkasin; Kumar, Anjani; Ahmed, Akhter U.; Davies, Stephen; Joshi, Pramod Kumar; Chen, Kevin Z.; Timmer, Peter; Dawe, David; Díaz-Bonilla, Eugenio; Torero, Máximo. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    2016 saw important developments with potentially wide repercussions for food security and nutrition in individual countries and regions. This section offers perspectives on food policy developments across the major regions: Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, Central Asia, South Asia, East Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean. Urbanization trends and related impacts on food security and nutrition are presented for each region. The individual regional sections cover many other critical topics: Acceleration of cooperation and investment in Africa to improve food security in the face of climate challenges and low commodity prices; Continuing conflict in the Middle East and North Africa, while some countries begin to face policy reform needs and realities of low oil prices; Central Asia’s promotion of agricultural diversification and regional integration to increase economic resilience; South Asia’s rapid growth and new investments and policies in the agriculture sector; Urbanization, changing diets, and regional growth in East Asia Recession in major economies of Latin America and the Caribbean along with El Niño’s effects on regional prospects.
  • Global Nutrition Report 2016: From Promise to Impact: Ending Malnutrition by 2030
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    Few challenges facing the global community today match the scale of malnutrition, a condition that directly affects 1 in 3 people. Malnutrition manifests itself in many different ways: as poor child growth and development; as individuals who are skin and bone or prone to infection; as those who are carrying too much weight or whose blood contains too much sugar, salt, fat, or cholesterol; or those who are deficient in important vitamins or minerals. Malnutrition and diet are by far the biggest risk factors for the global burden of disease: every country is facing a serious public health challenge from malnutrition. The economic consequences represent losses of 11 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) every year in Africa and Asia, whereas preventing malnutrion delivers $16 in returns on investment for every $1 spent. The world’s countries have agreed on targets for nutrition, but despite some progress in recent years the world is off track to reach those targets. This third stocktaking of the state of the world’s nutrition points to ways to reverse this trend and end all forms of malnutrition by 2030.
  • Global Nutrition Report 2016: From Promise to Impact: Ending Malnutrition by 2030: Summary
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    Few challenges facing the global community today match the scale of malnutrition, a condition that directly affects one in three people. Malnutrition manifests itself in many different ways: as poor child growth and development; as individuals who are skin and bone or prone to infection; as those who are carrying too much weight or who are at risk of chronic diseases because of excess intake of sugar, salt, or fat; or those who are deficient in important vitamins or minerals. Malnutrition and diet are by far the biggest risk factors for the global burden of disease: every country is facing a serious public health challenge from malnutrition. The economic consequences represent losses of 11 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) every year in Africa and Asia, whereas preventing malnutrion delivers $16 in returns on investment for every $1 spent. The world’s countries have agreed on targets for nutrition, but despite some progress in recent years the world is off track to reach those targets. This third stocktaking of the state of the world’s nutrition points to ways to reverse this trend and end all forms of malnutrition by 2030.
  • The new challenge: End all forms of malnutrition by 2030
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    It is a formidable challenge. Every country is facing a serious public health challenge from malnutrition (IFPRI 2014). One in three people is malnourished in one form or another (IFPRI 2015a). Malnutrition manifests itself in many forms: as children who do not grow and develop to their full potential, as people who are skin-and-bone or prone to infection, as people who carry too much weight or whose blood contains too much sugar, salt, or cholesterol.

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Briefs and Factsheets

  • Nutrition and economic development: Exploring Egypt's exceptionalism and the role of food subsidies: Synopsis
    Ecker, Olivier; Al-Riffai, Perrihan; Breisinger, Clemens; El-Batrawy, Rawia. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    Egypt faces two nutritional challenges. The first is the “growth-nutrition disconnect.” High economic growth has not been accompanied by reduction in chronic child malnutrition, at least throughout the 2000s. Instead, the prevalence of child stunting increased during this decade—an atypical trend for a country outside wartime. The second challenge is the simultaneous presence of chronic undernutrition and overnutrition (due to excess consumption of calories). This “double burden of malnutrition” exists not only at the national level but also within families and even individual children. Both challenges are exceptionally pronounced in Egypt compared to other developing countries. Nutrition and Economic Development: Exploring Egypt’s Exceptionalism and the Role of Food Subsidies examines the two nutritional challenges in depth and their relationship to public policy.
  • Egypt: Agricultural R&D indicators factsheet
    Stads, Gert-Jan; Moussa, Hoda; Badwan, Raed. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2015
    Abstract | Full Text
    This country factsheet presents key agricultural R&D indicators in a highly accessible visual display. The publication also feature a more in-depth analysis of some of the key challenges that the country’s agricultural R&D system is facing, and the policy options to address these challenges.
  • Tunisia: Agricultural R&D indicators factsheet
    Stads, Gert-Jan; Ben Rayana, Aniss; Berrbeh, Jamel; Laroussi, Ahlem; Badwan, Raed. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2015
    Abstract | Full Text
    This country factsheet presents key agricultural R&D indicators in a highly accessible visual display. The publication also feature a more in-depth analysis of some of the key challenges that the country’s agricultural R&D system is facing, and the policy options to address these challenges.
  • 2015 Nutrition country profile: Algeria
    International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Washington DC: IFPRI. 2015
    Abstract | Full Text
    The 193 individual country profiles capture the status and progress of all UN Member States, and the 80+ indicators include a wealth of information on child, adolescent and adult anthropometry and nutritional status, in addition to intervention coverage, food supply, economics, and demography. This tool is particularly useful for nutrition champions at the country-level, as it presents a wide range of evidence needed to assess country progress in improving nutrition and nutrition-related outcomes.

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Journal Articles

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Papers

  • Addressing transboundary cooperation in the Eastern Nile through the Water-Energy-Food Nexus: Insights from an E-survey and key informant interviews
    Berga, Helen; Ringler, Claudia; Bryan, Elizabeth; El Didi, Hagar; Elnasikh, Sara. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    The Nile is the lifeblood of northeastern Africa, and its roles for and interdependency with the national economies it traverses and binds together grow as it moves from source to sea. With rapid economic development—population growth, irrigation development, rural electrification, and overall economic growth—pressures on the Nile’s water resources are growing to unprecedented levels. These drivers of change have already contributed to stark changes in the hydropolitical regime, and new forms of cooperation and cross-sectoral collaboration are needed, particularly in the Eastern Nile Basin countries of Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan, and South Sudan. As direct sharing of water resources is hampered by unilateral developments, the need has increased for broader, cross-sectoral collaboration around the water, energy, and food sectors. This study is conducted to assess and understand the challenges of and opportunities for cooperation across the water-energy-food nexus nationally in Egypt, Ethiopia, and Sudan, as well as regionally across the Eastern Nile. To gather data, the paper uses an e-survey supplemented with key informant interviews geared toward national-level water, energy, and agriculture stakeholders, chiefly government staff and researchers. Findings from the survey tools suggest that most respondents strongly agree that collaboration across the water, energy, and agriculture sectors is essential to improve resource management in the region. At the same time, there is ample scope for improvement in collaboration across the water, energy, and food sectors nationally. Ministries of water, energy, and food were identified as the key nexus actors at national levels; these would also need to be engaged in regional cross-sectoral collaboration. Respondents also identified a wide range of desirable cross-sectoral actions and investments—both national and regional—chiefly, joint planning and operation of multipurpose infrastructure; investment in enhanced irrigation efficiency; joint rehabilitation of upstream catchments to reduce sedimentation and degradation; and investment in alternative renewable energy projects, such as wind and solar energy.
  • Linking the economics of water, energy, and food: A nexus modeling approach
    Al-Riffai, Perrihan; Breisinger, Clemens; Mondal, Md. Hossain Alam; Ringler, Claudia; Wiebelt, Manfred; Zhu, Tingju. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2017
    Abstract | Full Text
    We use an innovative methodology to model the socioeconomic linkages between water, energy, and food in the East Nile Basin. Based upon a theoretical nexus framework, the methodology is expanded into a quantifiable modeling suite that under-lies the analysis of each of three country case studies. The advantages are that, despite resource shortages being a challenge, the modeling suite aids in devising policies and strategies that formulate these sectoral interdependencies and provide the evidence-based research results necessary for their design in a way that exploits synergies existing across sectors, countries, and regions (Al-Zubari n.d.). This paper lays out the methodology and gives an example of an application and scenarios by focusing on three countries in the East Nile Basin. This methodology paper will be followed by three individual country case studies that highlight the water, energy, and food nexus for each.
  • The role of agriculture and the agro-processing industry for development in Egypt: An overview
    El-Enbaby, Hoda; Figueroa, Jose Luis; El-Didi, Hagar; Breisinger, Clemens. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    In order to complement the ongoing macroeconomic and safety net reforms in Egypt, it is important to foster additional sector-specific economic growth, especially in sectors that are good at creating jobs and reducing poverty. One sector that may help foster socioeconomic development in coming years is agriculture and related agro-processing industries. This paper shows that agriculture in Egypt continues to play a relatively important role in the economy compared to other mid-dle income countries. The sector’s stable growth performance has proved to be a reliable contributor to economy-wide output growth over the past decades. The underlying productivity gains have prevented the country’s food import depend-ency ratio from rising in spite of rapidly growing food demand.
  • An agriculture- and trade-focused social accounting matrix for Tunisia, 2012
    Thabet, Chokri. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2016
    Abstract | Full Text
    The purpose of this paper is to document the different steps followed to construct the Tunisian Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) for the year 2012. More precisely, it describes the estimation methods and the nature of data used in the development of the SAM, which has a specific focus on the agriculture and food sectors. The SAM also features a regional disaggregation by three agro-ecological zones. The data used in the construction process are based on two main publications of the “Institut National de la Statistique” (INS): the input-output table (I/O) (2012) and the supply-use table (2012). The I/O (2012) disaggregates the Tunisian economy into 24 sectors, including two agri-food sectors: (1) Agriculture and Fishery, and (2) Food Industries. The supply-use table accounts for about 400 commodities, of which 59 are agriculture, forestry, and fishery products and 64 are processed-food products. Other major information sources used include the household survey publication (2010), the annual report of the Central Bank (2013), the “Annuaire des Statistiques Agricoles” (Ministry of Agriculture 2013c), and the “Budget Economique” (2013).

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Reports

  • Agricultural R&D in West Asia and North Africa: Recent investment and capacity trends
    Stads, Gert-Jan. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2015
    Abstract | Full Text
    This report assesses trends in investments and human resource capacity in agricultural R&D in WANA, focusing on developments during 2009–2012. The analysis is based on information from a set of country factsheets prepared by the Agricultural Science and Technology Indicators (ASTI) program of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), using comprehensive datasets derived from primary surveys targeting over 300 agencies in 11 countries during 2013–2014. Accounting for about two-thirds of the region’s total agricultural gross domestic product (AgGDP), the 11 sample countries do not provide a complete overview of agricultural R&D expenditures and staffing in the region as a whole. Yet, these countries are representative of the region’s diversity in terms of income level, country size, and agroclimatic characteristics.
  • How to build resilience to conflict: The role of food security
    Breisinger, Clemens; Ecker, Olivier; Maystadt, Jean-François; Trinh Tan, Jean-François; Al-Riffai, Perrihan; Bouzar, Khalida; Sma, Abdelkarim; Abdelgadir, Mohamed. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2014
    Abstract | Full Text
    This Food Policy Report explains why there is a need to place even higher priority on food security-related policies and programs in conflict-prone countries, and offers insights for policymakers regarding how to do so. To understand the relationship between conflict and food security, this report builds a new conceptual framework of food security and applies it to four case studies on Egypt, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen. It argues that food security-related policies and programs build resilience to conflict insofar as they are expected not only to help countries and people cope with and recover from conflict but also to contribute to preventing conflicts and support economic development more broadly: by helping countries and people become even better off.
  • Enhancing WFP’s capacity and experience to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate vouchers and cash transfer programmes: Study summary
    Hoddinott, John F.; Gilligan, Daniel O.; Hidrobo, Melissa; Margolies, Amy; Roy, Shalini; Sandström, Susanna; Schwab, Benjamin; Upton, Joanna. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2013
    Abstract | Full Text
    With support from the Government of Spain, and in partnership with the World Food Programme (WFP), researchers from the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) evaluated four pilot projects to assess the comparative performance of cash transfers, food payments, and vouchers on household food security and other outcomes of interest to WFP. The studies in Ecuador, Uganda, Niger, and Yemen were carried out over the period 2010–2012.
  • Impact evaluation of cash and food transfers for the seasonal emergency safety net in Hajjah and Ibb Governorates, Yemen endline report
    Schwab, Benjamin; Margolies, Amy; Hoddinott, John F.. Washington DC: IFPRI. 2013
    Abstract | Full Text
    This report is the final impact evaluation of the World Food Programme’s Cash and Food transfer program in Yemen. The program operated in Hajjah and Ibb governorates within the larger Emergency Safety Net (ESN), which provides assistance to qualifying households in rural Yemen. The report details the relative effectiveness of each modality at alleviating food security among the targeted population.

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